Jibs

Jibs are designed for sailing in heavier winds, approximately over 20 knots true, where you will need a headsail smaller than an overlapping genoa. Depending on how your boat is rigged, how you use the boat. and the intended sailing areas, there are a variety of options to suit the conditions. Below are the various types of jibs HOOD builds. We are happy to work with you and better understand how you sail to determine what the right fit is for you.

Solent Jibs

These are jibs, around 90% LP, that set on a dedicated removable stay located just aft of the headstay so these are not staysails in the sense of a “Cutter” rig where you can have two sails set at the same time. Typical specialized detailing includes hanks, either conventional side pull bronze hanks or newer style composite soft hanks. These sails can have reefs in them. These are designed, engineered and installed in the same fashion as reefs in a mainsail and can have battens. Battens can be advantageous because the sail is often tall and skinny and battens help support the shape in sails with “high aspect ratios”. We can put an orange colored patch in the head of the sail for improved visibility.

 

Cross Cut dacron hank on forestaysail on a bristol 41-1.

Cross Cut dacron hank on forestaysail on a Bristol 41-1.

Challenge 72 heading to sea with small Yankee and forestaysail,

Challenge 72 heading to sea with small Yankee and forestaysail.

Forestaysails

These sails are similar to a Solent in that they are used when the larger headsail is too much sail for the conditions. These types of staysails are often used in conjunction with the headsails (Yankees) for boats rigged as Cutters. There are small details in the geometry of the two sails, but the available detailing and options remain the same.

 

Storm Jibs 

This storm trysail is being checked for fit and rigging on a J-105 used for offshore double-handed racing.

This storm trysail is being checked for fit and rigging on a J-105 used for offshore double-handed racing.

Bi-radial storm jib on a bristol 41-1 for the Bermuda Race. This sail has an orange patch on the head, but today almost all storm sails are completely orange.

Bi-radial storm jib on a Bristol 41-1 for the Bermuda Race. 

These are a very specific sail intended to be the last sail standing, and perhaps, used in 45-50 knots of true wind. Even if you are not sailing, a storm jib can be used to keep the boat stable if you want to heave to. As such, they need be 110% reliable. Common detailing includes triple stitching, heavy-duty leech and foot cords, hanks doubled up in the head OR on boats where this sail will be set in a foil, back up grommets in the luff in the event the foil is damaged and head and tack pennants. If you are planning on doing any racing in the ocean, this sail must meet certain requirements including being made of orange material, a good idea in any case.

 

Cross Cut Vektron Yankee on a 43 cruising boat.

Cross Cut Vektron Yankee on a 43 cruising boat.

A Challenge 72 heading to sea with her Yankee and staysail set.

A Challenge 72 heading to sea with her Yankee and staysail set.

Yankees

Yankees are short LP sails, usually 100% LP or less, with a high clew, usually set on the furler and often used on cutters. They share much of the detailing of “Genoas” specifically leading the leech line to the tack. They may or may not have the reefing detailing. If the Yankee is set on a furler, it will have UV protection.

 

 

Blade Jibs

This Blade jib was built by HOOD Argentina for one of their racing customers.

This Blade jib was built by HOOD Argentina for one of their racing customers.

This W-46 was designed with a blade jib as a primary headsail. Here Nashua shows her HOOD load path "Racing" wardrobe.

This W-46 was designed with a blade jib as a primary headsail. This boat shows her HOOD load path “Racing” wardrobe.

Blade Jibs are sails that have several names including Number 3 & 100% Jib. They are generally a sail that is on the order of 100% LP, but this depends on where the sail will sheet. This is a sail commonly used by sailors doing some racing when their big genoa is too much. The detailing is broadly the same as for Genoas without the reefing detailing. HOOD can place battens in either orientation, parallel to the luff so you can roll the sail up, or square to the leech, if the sail is to be raised and lowered rather than rolled. Telltale windows and draft stripes are common in sails to be used racing. A UV cover is available as well.

 

Heavy Weather Jib

Like Storm Jibs, a Heavy Weather Jib is a very specific sail with its definition promulgated by the framers of offshore racing rules. Broadly, they may be no bigger in area than a size derived from a formula related to the boat’s foretriangle. They may not have a reef and they must have “an alternative method of attachment” (aka back up grommets) in the luff.  This enables the crew to tie the luff to the foil in the event the foil is damaged. Detailing is based on the other smaller sails noted above and focused on the boat, the crew, and the intended races or other offshore sailing proposed. They can be set on the Solent Stay or on a cutter stay or similar dedicated inside stay arrangement.

 

 

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